Recommended Teaching Tech: Planboard

Teachers all have their own education apps or tech they use to help make learning more effective and enjoyable, but sometimes it’s useful to have something that makes life easier for themselves. One such application I’ve used over the last school year is Chalk.com’s Planboard.

As teachers, most of us make daily use of our planbooks – whether it be for planning lessons, recording marks and assessments, noting when the next staff meeting will take place, or reminding ourselves of what needs to be done after school. They are useful and many administrations expect that their teachers use them, both for encouraging good practice and showing accountability. I used to find it annoying having to carry a planbook back and forth to different places and found I could need access to it at the most inconvenient times when I didn’t have it with me. Enter Planboard.

Planboard is a web and mobile based application that allows teachers to input their class schedule and access it anywhere, which makes quick reference easy at any time. You don’t have to fill out page after page with your schedule, as must be done in paper planbooks, rather you create your timetable during setup, insert any holidays in the school year, and the app does the rest for you. You can see what your schedule will be months ahead of time.

planboardschedule

Above is my schedule from last school year. As you can see, you can colour code classes to make quick reference easier. Another helpful feature is being able to convert nearly everything in Planboard into a PDF file for emailing, recordkeeping, or printing.

This alone is nothing overly special, as one can easily print a blank timetable and fill it in, but what is really useful is that planboard allows you to write lesson plans for each class, just as you would in a planbook. I find this is actually more useful than a physical book, because I’m a faster typer than writer and there’s the option for inserting images, video, hypertext, attach files, and pretty much anything else you need. The fact that it quick saves constantly is super useful as well. The lesson space looks like this:

planboardsample

This is part of a lesson plan I left for a substitute teacher one day. You can see the course name and section, unit being covered, name of lesson or outcome being addressed, and details of the lesson. There’s also a useful sticky note, which can be used for reminders or other general information. Lessons can be viewed by day, as shown above, or by week, month, or unit. If I need to print a day’s lessons, I just click the PDF button in the top right of the page and Planboard creates a printable PDF that can be saved. The mobile version of the above looks something like this:

I like that I can plan lessons quickly from anywhere in a matter of moments. As teachers, we all know that often ideas come to mind at odd times, or when we aren’t in school, so having a quick and easy way to incorporate these things into what we do is useful. There are a lot of other interesting and useful details in the application that you’ll find if you take a little time to explore and make yourself familiar with them.

To this point, I’ve mostly used Planboard for daily lessons and recordkeeping, but there are options for creating unit plans and assigning lessons to each unit. You can also insert standards or outcomes that can be attached to units, or specific lessons, which is great when showing someone else what is being covered in the lesson, or for keeping yourself on track when it comes to covering those important outcomes.

Chalk.com has also added sections to Planboard like Markboard for recording assessments, attendance, and another for resources. Another great feature that Chalk.com has worked into this application is the ease with which sharing can occur, either through email, or among other users on the platform. I hope to try some of these in the future.

Planboard is a convenient way to do and combine some of the things that teachers do anyway, but anything that makes these parts of my job quicker or easier, so I can focus on teaching and the learning happening in my classroom is worth a little time to try out.

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