Student Inquiry: Illustrated

Standard

I hope to move this site more towards education and social studies more generally, and inquiry-based learning more specifically (more on this in future posts). For now, I’d like to share a great visual by Trevor MacKenzie (twitter: @trev_mackenzie), an educator from Victoria, who has summarized the four types of inquiry activities students engage in during learning.

InquiryEd

As you can see, there is a dichotomy between the role of the teacher and student, which changes from one category to another. First, the teacher can lead whole group discovery by immersing herself in the activity and serving as a leader and model in that discovery. Second, the teacher may create a less structured inquiry by providing some choice among specific content pieces to be used, but students do the bulk of exploration themselves. Third, the teacher provides inquiry guidance, but allows for greater student control of the task by opening up the options for task product, question formulation, and even the scope and focus of the inquiry. Finally, free inquiry gives students the greatest freedom in their choice of learning by removing restrictions around topic, task, and stated knowledge outcomes. In a sense, they learn based on their own interests and abilities, employing their strengths and developing competencies.

Such a model for learning is powerful in how it can engage students of a range of backgrounds and academic levels, but these four categories should not be considered a ranking system. There are times when each type can be beneficial – students new to inquiry may not benefit fully from guided or free inquiry if skills and understanding of what is involved have not been learned. It is important for the teacher to know her students and what will work best in their education. I view these as strategies the teacher can use to structure learning depending on the background of her students and the learning outcomes being taught. What teacher doesn’t want more options available when teaching students?

I believe Trevor is planning a larger publication on inquiry-based learning in the near future, so I’d recommend a follow on twitter. You can also check out his blog.

2 thoughts on “Student Inquiry: Illustrated

  1. Great blog post here Stephen and an excellent blog. Thanks for sharing your practice and thoughts with us all! Specifically I love how you unpack the graphic here “There are times when each type can be beneficial – students new to inquiry may not benefit fully from guided or free inquiry if skills and understanding of what is involved have not been learned. It is important for the teacher to know her students and what will work best in their education. I view these as strategies the teacher can use to structure learning depending on the background of her students and the learning outcomes being taught.” I couldn’t agree more. Knowing your students and building relationships prior to embarking on a transition to an inquiry model is imperative. As educators working with young people everything we do boils down to relationships first. With this comes a clearer understanding of the whole learner, one that enables us to better meet their needs using the Types of Student Inquiry model.
    Indeed, there is a pending publication that delves more in to this framework. I look forward to sharing it with you and continuing our learning together!
    Cheers Stephen.

    • Hey, thanks for the comment. I agree with your points and appreciate you taking the time to comment. I hope to add more to this site on inquiry-based learning as time goes by.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s